Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal to provide free community college received the overwhelming endorsement of state lawmakers Tuesday night, passing the House of Representatives on an 87-8 vote.

The House joined the Senate in approving “Tennessee Promise,” the plan Haslam laid out in February to cover the full cost of two-year collegefor every high school graduate starting in fall 2015.

The plan also calls for reducing the amount of Hope scholarships for freshmen and sophomores at state universities to $3,500, a cut of $500 a year. Juniors and seniors would receive $4,500.

The vote capped a busy legislative day that also saw proposal to combat methamphetamine production by limiting sales of pseudoephedrine clear the state Senate on a 23-8 vote.

Pseudoephedrine is a key ingredient in several cold and allergy medications, as well as in methamphetamine. Senate Bill 1751 by state Sen. Mark Norris, R-Collierville, would require a prescription to purchase more than 4.8 grams of pseudoephedrine a month, and 14.4 grams a year.

This monthly maximum could be reached with 20 tablets of 24-hour Allegra D. The yearly maximum would be 60 tablets.

Last week, the House passed a bill that would set annual limit at 120 tablets of 24-hour medication. The differences between the two bills are likely to be worked out in a conference committee.

Also Tuesday, the governor’s plan for school vouchers failed, likely ending hopes that state lawmakers will agree on a plan this year.

Haslam had proposed to offer as many as 5,000 vouchers next year for private school tuition to families in Davidson and four other school districts. The plan would have benefited low-income families assigned to low-performing schools primarily.

But citing a lack of support, the sponsor withdrew the measure Tuesday morning in one of the final meetings of the year for the House Finance Committee, which had to sign off on the bill before it could be taken up on the House floor.

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